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Posted by perrylb on Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 9:25am
by Eve Parsons The morning of June 30th finally arrived, and our departure for Peru was underway.  The anticipation and excitement dates back to December when I first realized I would be part of this trip.  A grant from the National Science Foundation awarded to Dr. Baker Perry made it possible for a teacher from Watauga County to travel alongside Appalachian State faculty and students in Peru.  As the bus departed Boone I could only imagine what experiences were just ahead of us...
Posted by perrylb on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 - 10:27am
By Evan Montpellier Before setting out on the Quelccaya expedition, our research team had the unique opportunity to present work on Andean precipitation to a group of students from the National University of Saint Anthony the Abbot in Cuzco (UNSAAC). One of the most interesting parts of this experience was the setting of our presentations. Museo Inka, located in Cusco, is where Machu Picchu artifacts from the Yale expedition of 1911 lead by Hiram Bingham are housed. Being surrounded by rich...
Posted by perrylb on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 10:30pm
By: Courtney Cooper, Ph.D. Student in Water Resources, University of Idaho The Cordillera Real mountain range defines a large portion of the Bolivian Andes. In dramatic fashion, it divides the Amazonian lowlands to the east from the high plateau of the Altiplano. Trekkers, climbers, and mountaineers often start their adventures in the Cordillera Real from the small community of Sorata. Mountains in this area reach elevations greater than 6,000 meters and are central to the culture and...
Posted by perrylb on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 7:57pm
By Mickey Shortt, Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation On June 30, 2016 we set out on an adventure we had been anticipating for months.  Our organization, the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation, has had a relationship with Appalachian State University for several years.  Our partnership is strongest with the Geography Department—so strong that we were included in a National Science Foundation grant awarded to Baker Perry at ASU.  This grant permits an education...
Posted by perrylb on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 7:44pm
By Jason Endries, Graduate Research Assistant   Introduction Despite the importance of the weather on the ecosystems and resources of the Central Andes, the meteorology of the region is poorly understood in the scientific community. As a result, there are gaps in the knowledge surrounding the exact impact of precipitation events on glaciers in the area, the interpretation of ice cores from these glaciers, and the steps needed to prepare for the future as these glaciers continue to...
Posted by perrylb on Sunday, September 6, 2015 - 3:17pm
by Darcy Grimes, 2012 NC Teacher of the Year and K-12 Educational Consultant   Walking down the long, dirt road to the school carrying a box of school supplies I wondered, “Is this real?  Am I really in Peru?  Am I really about to meet students who go to school and live in these amazing, wonderful mountains?”   We entered the fence and walked into the courtyard of the school. The principal and the teacher came out to meet us with huge smiles on their faces.  They...
Posted by perrylb on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 1:32pm
by Eric Burton, Undergraduate Research Assistant After our expeditions to Osjollo Anante and Quelccaya in the Cordillera Vilcanota of Peru, we made a short trip to Bolivia.  There, we met with an impressive team of atmospheric scientists from the Universidad Mayor de San Andrés (UMSA) in La Paz.  This group is in charge of the Chacaltaya Observatory where Dr. Perry installed a precipitation monitoring station last year, and one of the faculty members who will be working on the...
Posted by perrylb on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 12:59pm
by Jason Endries, Graduate Research Assistant                 Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be on top of a glacier, a place that very few humans ever go? I certainly did before my trip to Peru this past July but now I can say that I have experienced it firsthand. Simply put, it’s other-worldly. Vast expanses of snow and ice sometimes as far as the eye can see, beautifully warm sunshine during the day and a ghostly glow from the moon at night,...
Posted by perrylb on Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 10:01pm
By Baker Perry We completed the installation of the Chacaltaya, Bolivia, comprehensive precipitation monitoring station (Fig. 1) this past week. This station is located at 5,160 m (16,929 ft) just over the ridge from where the Chacaltaya glacier and highest ski slope in the world existed until 2009 (Fig. 2), when what was left of the glacier completely ablated.  There were some challenges the first week, as it snowed 10 cm (4”) on 21 October 2014 (13 mm or 0.50” snow liquid equivalent...
Posted by perrylb on Saturday, October 18, 2014 - 8:06pm
By Baker Perry We have now completed the installation of a comprehensive precipitation monitoring station at 5,650 m (18,537 ft) on the Quelccaya Icecap (Fig. 1) in the Cordillera Vilcanota of Peru. The Quelccaya Icecap is the largest glacier in the tropics and an important site for the study of past climates using ice cores. On our initial expedition in early August, our team consisted of project collaborator Dr. Anton Seimon, Felipe Crispin, David Crispin, and Christian Crispin. We (well,...
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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number AGS-1347179. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.